Two Questions: Romantic and Point of View


#1

So I’ve always wondered, which one readers would rather see.

First when it comes to romance do you guys think it would be better if everyone was bi-sexual so you can just romance/or not romance any one you want to? Or do like seeing the realistic romance, where some romance options are off limits depending on your gender and sexuality?

Second question is do you guys like the second point of view that is so common or would you be okay with a first person point of view, something similar to Life of a Mobster?


Limited Romance Options in Choice of Games
#2
  1. I guess realistic?
  2. both are cool.

#3

I like the Dragon Age 2 all-pansexual ROs. That way no one playing the game feels left out. Years on, people are still clamouring for gay Morrigan…

I enjoy third person points of view. I don’t really identify with my main characters anyway.


#4
  1. I’d go with realistic , it really isn’t a problem , if I’d want a specific romance , I’d just make another character at the end of the game . Also I like the fact that some NPCs have diffrent sexualities , it gives them personality !

  2. Not sure what you’re refering to , but I’d probably have to go with first person , because I’d want to be the MC of a story I read / game I play .


#5

For the first I think you should have the characters orientation already in mind when you write them. It is a part of who they are. To make it so there are options for everyone you might just have to make more characters ROs, this also would increase repay value as it offers additional branching paths.

For the second it really comes down to writing style. How do you plan to tell your story? Are we the MC or are we a guide on their journey?


#6

I prefer realistic romantic interests where their sexualities are what they are regardless of your gender or sexuality.

As for the POV, for CoG games, I personally prefer second person, but I would absolutely play a game written in third or first person if I found it interesting.


#7

Don’t we all

But any way

  1. I like all bi characters because I don’t really like playing as a male character in any game and I guess some people will feel the same
    2)I guess any will do

#8

I think I like the notion of every character being romantically open to relationships with any genders, but something that is often missing is the justification for this.

Usually writers just make it plain that their character’s sexual orientation is altered depending on the player’s desires, and to me that can seem a little robotic, a little like you’re giving me the player too much choice, removing that character’s agency.

Instead, I think writers could take a little time to write about worlds where either physically or socially sexuality has evolved to the point that people are sort of universally sexually compatible? Or maybe write about a non-human player character who has their own set of gender norms, maybe adding several new genders with their own complex rules and taboos. I would play the hell out of that game.


#9

People have also weighed in on the subject of RO’s and gender/sexuality assignments here and again on this thread.


#10
  1. Realistic - but I don’t hate/dislike it if they choose to make everyone bisexual or whatever one calls it…

  2. Err, I can be okay with both, but… Let’s put it this way: I’ve bought and played Lucid’s Lost Heir 1 & 2, but when I tried out the demo versions of Life of a Wizard and Life of a Moster by that same Lucid… Neither felt as appealing to me, and I’m pretty certain it’s because of the style they’re written in - it just doesn’t feel quite as fun as when it feels like I’m going through an autobiography rather than a story… :sweat:


#11

I completely see what you are talking about but do want to ask, do you not see the replaying value in a game with all bi-characters? Or do you just see it more interesting because set orientations lead down obvious different paths? What I mean is that with a bi character male and female MC’s would get pretty much the same lines/treatment/etc. While set orientations would give more variety to each gender and so on?


#12

Like I was saying, you should have this in mind when you are writing them. Are they strait, bi, gay, pan? It is part of their identity. I think it adds depth to the character if they are already determined. They should have their strengths, quirks, and motivations. This also includes who they might find attractive.

The way I would write them is to imagine them as actual people. Who are they and what drives them? How would they react being put in a given situation? When it comes to sexuality think of it as how it might play out with an actual person. They might not even be into males or they might not like females, perhaps they like both or they don’t really care either way. It adds realism to the character. You can’t always have what you want in life and the odds all your friends are bi is very unrealistic. I know people read stuff for an escape from reality but I feel it should still be somewhat grounded. You can add variety by adding enough ROs to create options. This way you won’t be detracting from your characters personalities.


#13
  1. I always found all characters being bisexual a bit… Odd and highly unrealistic. It almost breaks immersion for me but that might be a personal thing since in my 21 years of life I never met a bisexual person (IRL) so seeing all ROs being bisexual just feels as unrealistic as it can possibly get which, as I said, breaks immersion.

Plus not all people are bisexual. Some are straight, some are gay. It reminds me how in Dragon Age Inquisition there was this lesbian chick, only datable looking one and the only chick with a datable personality. Sucks that she’s gay but that just made me like her as a character more, it made her less flat and more real.

Then again I’m all about immersion even if it is to the detriment of the game itself.

I can see why people like it when all characters are bisexual, there is a certain amount of appeal to that. But at the same time it can potentially make the choice of gender irrelevant or lessen its impact.

Tl;Dr Realism always.

  1. Depends on the writer. Both are perfectly fine in my opinion so long as you can do it well. So do whatever you do best.

#14

I don’t find it odd at all when everyone is bisexual. Most of my friends are! I think we all stick together or something, haha. As long as they’re fully fleshed characters, and they make sense in their world, then it’s fine. It’s also fine if they have their own specific sexualities (straight, gay, whatever).

It’s a bit more odd when it’s obvious their sexuality changes SPECIFICALLY for you. Player-sexual characters loose quite a bit of depth, I think. Honestly, everything boils down to how well written they are. If you can sell me their character, they can have whatever preference they like.

I’ve only ever played games in second person, I think. If I played any other way then I didn’t notice, and thus, don’t care.


#15

This idea of “realism” as if bi and pansexuals don’t flock to one another for solace in this cold, hard, het world.


#16

“Wait, you like girls too? Like, like them? Does that mean you like me??”

“Oh god, where did my people go…” :sob:


#17

@Blazerules You’ve never met a bisexual person IRL? That’s so… weird to me, because, like @iris, most of my friends are bi or pan. And isn’t like we found each other in some LGBTQIA group, we all just grew up together (in Alabama, no less). In any case, I very much agree with you. (I loved the DAI had two gay characters. It definitely felt more realistic.)


#18

That you know of. :wink: Slight nuance there.

As for the original topic:

  1. As people before me have aptly demonstrated with the Morrigan example: pansexual ROs are the best. :grin:
    The series Choice of the Deathless actually comes to mind; I think the whole gender-swapping ROs to suit the player is well done and since the characters have substance it doesn’t feel like it diminishes the story in any way.
    I don’t think gender (or for that matter sexual orientation) is that important in determining what makes an NPC who he/she/they are. It’s part of it but really shouldn’t be the focal point unless the game is expressly adressing issues pertaining to gender discrimination.

  2. really used to the 2nd person point of view but I don’t think that a different one would deter me from reading and enjoying the story


#19

Hence why I said met rather than ever seen. Then again any non straight sexuality is incredibly rare here. You could say they hide it but whenever someone says they are gay or bi people tend to think they are awesome for how rare a being they are :joy:

It being common is probably an american thing or something.

On the actual subject though… I do agree that sexuality also plays a part in the personality of a character. It is a part of who they are and thus influences them. You know, our personality is basically a culmination of all of our traits + personal experiences after all.

Although I bet you could use the idea of all bisexual ROs as a rather interesting concept for a game… You know, being a part of such a group since apparently they all stick together as iris has mentioned. That actually sounds like it could make for an interesting read o.O


#20
  1. As long as the characters aren’t flat and you have romantic options for each orientation available to the player I don’t care if RO’s are orientation locked or fluid. but I agree with what a lot of people have been saying if the change is blantantly reliant on the player without an outside reason it’s flat.

  2. I like first and second person perspectives.

@Blazerules
I doubt differing sexual orientations being common is an American thing. Lots of countries legalized gay marriage and rights before we did. Though it maybe that we’re more outspoken about it in our day to day life vs. other countries considering it more of a personal topic. I do agree using the reason behind Bi-sexual RO’s as a game concept could be a very interesting read since I had a similar experience where most of my friends growing up were bi or non-binary.