Whats Your Writing Style?


#1

Hello, I would like to know… How you write a ChoiceScript story. Such as… Do you write the content and then troubleshoot the problems to occur? Or… If you write the story up until the point where you find a problem, and then try to fix it? Or if you just do some other different way. If so, let me know what way you write it. I just want to see how much people write the same way, and if possible, let me know the pros and cons of your writing style.


#2

I broke my WiP into 8 chapters and I tend to post every chapter or half chapter to my WiP thread so folks can identify typos and continuity/choice errors.

I like this middle ground approach. Fixing and diagnosing every single error as you go would seem to make for sloooow going, while waiting until your WiP is finished before addressing these issues would present a hugely daunting task and might require a LOT of rewriting.

However, folks will have different approaches and I look forward to hearing them.


#3

I actually write it all before posting the beta, and I do ALL the debugging at the end xD it helps me to focus on the writing, but it can get pretty monotonous to fix dozens of errors all at one time.


#4

My current approach is write the story and at every *choice, I run a randomtest to see if there’s a coding error. Once I finish a Chapter, I run it through OpenOffice for a spellcheck before I compile and post it up for people to read and let me know of any other mistakes that I made (self-proof read is an impossibility for me).


#5

I’m with Sam. I write it all myself first and only then let anyone else see it. Right now I’m 510k into my second game and it’s 100% my work (for good and bad). I write it, I proofread it, I play it through and make changes, etc. I couldn’t do it any other way because I want to write the games/stories I want to write. Feedback is essential to making them better, and beta testers etc. can see flaws in your game that you’d never see yourself, but it’s feedback on the finished draft.

Though HornHeadFan is right about the problem with that approach. You might wind up having to make big structural or thematic changes to your work. But personally I’d rather go that way than to post and discuss every scene in the game practically line by line.


#6

@distracteddad
My thoughts exactly. I did wind up making a lot of changes (at first you killed all your enemies, now you keep most of them alive for various reasons), but over all I’d prefer to have it beta rather than alpha tested because I know exactly how my plot is gonna be.

I mainly value testing for adding stuff, and fixing all the continuity and coding errors, and typos.

EDIT
And wow, that’s a really good size. Can’t wait to see it!


#7

@distracteddad, from one dad to another, you must tell me how you schedule enough writing time to crank out not only PQ but also a 510K+ WiP??


#8

Quantity not quality. :slight_smile:


#9

Lol xD!


#10

I have a really bad writing style; I publish short chapters with bugs in them. Silly me.


#11

@Aquos_Boost
I like to make sure it passes quick test before I post anything.


#12

I don’t have any writing style because my english is so bad.


#13

@MutonElite
When I mess up the indenting like that, I just do this:


\*goto code
     \*label code
     \*codey stuff

#14

I generally focus on the code, playtesting it all the while. The actual writing seems to fall between the cracks for the most part. I still have a few choices that when picked will only read blah. :stuck_out_tongue: While of course changing a bunch of variables in the background.

The downside is when I’m on a roll and write maybe a 100 lines of code without testing, then I test it only to find that I have to re-indent the whole darn thing. X_X All it takes is one sleepy moment.

I also tend to get bogged down with details (more of a personal problem really), fine tuning before adding new content. In maybe 2-3 weeks time now, I still haven’t made it past the first chapter, but I’ve got a really nice UI (user interface). The parts that don’t read blah anyways.


#15

@Samuel_H_Young

That would be a nice fix, except I usually do those kind of mistakes in *choices. And I don’t think that would work there. Or would it? Hmm perhaps if one were to use two *choices and sorta work around it maybe… Never tried.

*choice
#one
----*goto one
------*choice
--------#badly indented code?
----------*goto somewhere

Speaking of which, how do I make those yellow boxes?


#16

Oh, yeah. That’s a little trickier xD.

And you use this, without spaces:

< pre >

< /pre >


#17

Thank you. :slight_smile:


test


#18

No problem!