What is an underused character trope/archetype/etc that you love/wanna see more of?

Yep. Especially since it isn’t brainwashing by some magical or technologic means - his own flaws are used to turn him into one of the finest pilots on enemy side.

Like a member of a cult, he doesn’t truly remember anything from his former life anymore and would not remember you either, unless you can break through the shell formed by years of servitude, conditioning and manipulation. He remembers his love for MC as something both foreign and nostalgic, and knows them as they were all those years before.

To keep that on topic, that is something I would like to see as well. I love the trope of Blood Knight twisted by his worst traits into something wrong when the morality chain is broken. I like the idea of two Blood Knights or generally horrible people being each other’s morality chains that keep the worst of them at bay.

I suppose I also like very happy and loving villain couples, too. My characters are rarely someone you’d call a good person with ease.

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YESSSS!! I have so many characters like this, shdfnkjsdf. Two of em are straight up father-son, too. There are so many ways you can play with this dynamic.

OOH!! The parallels of who they used to be VS who they are now!! Love me some of that stuff; it’s actually in the IF I’m tentatively drafting right now, albeit less intense (But more complicated??? Necromancy is weird). I just like the whole “characters who knew eachother but have been distant for years reuniting” thing, no matter what form it takes, haha. Your project sounds right up my alley.

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I mean, relationship bars in general turns relationships into math. And thinking about it, it’s almost impossible to not know before playing who are the romanceable characters, kind of unavoidable. But I’d rather not know :sweat_smile:

…how so? I find myself very able to avoid knowing who are the romanceable characters before playing, simply by not reading information about the game beforehand (apart the blurb). How is it unavoidable?

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That’s fair! I’ve certainly played games without them, though I do like to have them there just because I get curious about what types of things impact relations (not a big fan of when disagreeing automatically equates to a relationship hit. Feel like being able to disagree on things is Good Actually).

I think to parlay this back into the topic at hand, I’d like to see more characters that lie and misdirect without either being transparently obvious or straight up antagonists (in the sense that there is zero reason to trust them in the first place).

Like, few things completely snipe me like realising after the fact that I’ve been played. It’s just a difficult thing to get right, because when it’s poorly executed, it makes the MC look stupid or the narrative come across as disengenuous for concealing information that should have been obvious.

But when it hits right it’s so gooood.

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It’s unavoidable because I’m too curious! :joy:

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But what if it’s a) not a “romance” game and b) a part of the plot? If it’s spy-fi and your MC is the victim of a honeypot type plot, then it could work well as a part of the game that yes, is probably going to piss people off, but isn’t going to suddenly invalidate all of the player’s choices because it’s a well-known type of plot for that type of story. Would you still be so against it then? The context for a fake RO is likely to be on of the biggest factors in its success. I think it would depend wholly on what comes after (for a lot of players) not just that the RO was fake.

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In my opinion the “Fake RO”, especially if it’s not labeled as such, just feels like “Haha you picked the wrong one, try again next time”. And i don’t like my time wasted with something like that.

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Before I started code diving, I had played through two separate CoG games thinking there were no male ROs at all, only to find out later there were. So you’re right… you can easily not know.

I agree with @ParrotWatcher on this, especially that ROs shouldn’t be too hard to romance/save. If that brainwashed RO can be saved (and it’s not so damned hard to do), then it’s not a “fake” RO to me. If it’s always going to end in tragedy, then it’s a fake and I’d be pissed that I got bamboozled into it.

Don’t care. Don’t sell me a game with “romance” implied, then take it away as a gotchya. This isn’t The Usual Suspects, it’s a game. And it’s not fun for me to play through trying to find a happy ending for my MC only to find out they get stomped in the dirt in the end, no matter what they do.

I think this is one of those topics that will always have a divided response. It’s the difference between people who want to play a game that leaves them feeling good at the end versus the people who enjoy pain, agony, and everyone dying at the end because “It feels more real”. I don’t want real. If I wanted reality, I wouldn’t waste my time with fiction or video games. I can OD on misery by watching the news.

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I imagined him being saved by sorta-kinda Hawkins terms, but a bit more elaborate. Essentially focuses on awakening the memories of you that he still has, remembering the feelings of love he had and then, through that, we break the shell and return him to our side alive because mecha pilots are pretty damn rare and ones like him in skill is even rarer.

Whew, not a fake LI. Now onto to worrying about my current project’s romance cast.

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Sorry, I’m not sure what honeypot type plot means - you mean that fake RO lures MC into something with premise of romance?

But would that kind of “affair” come with warning?
I really don’t want to invest my time, money into game that implies romance but in the end it turns out it’s not going to happen anyway.

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That’s why my first point was “what if it’s not a romance game.” Romantic interests and byplay can show up in any genre; if it’s not the main focus or point of the story, would a false RO still drive you away? And yes, that is exactly what a honeypot is. The “romance” or seduction is a means to get the unknowing party to either do or get something for the other person. Generally it’s information or access. A lot of con artists use honeypot tactics, and they are broadly successful. In part because many of the people victimized don’t want to admit to having been fooled/used in such a manner.

The one main romance option in my game so far is an are-they-or-aren’t-they potential honeypot. Some people hated that, some loved it. Just about all recognized that it’s not a romance game, though…and the relative dearth of ROs hasn’t kept it from being successful.

Write what you want to write, as well as you can. Don’t get sucked into trying to let an imagined audience steer your story. That way lies half-heartedness, formula, and dead cliche – if you finish at all.

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I would love a MC who IS Not either shy or bold but well normal? In most romance games you are either bold(often more one the creepy Side) or a blushing mess, it is really rare that you can act normal IT May be Seen as boring, but I would like that. Just some “I like you, what do you think about a Date” yes there ist less possibility for angst ( I hate this Word) but not everyone needs angst for a good romance.

One a similar Side, I 'd like more Options to be a good character without being a naive Idiot. I can be nice towards someone without trusting them blindly, such things are possible.

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My thoughts on the ‘fake’ RO discussion:

A really important point for me, is whether the RO in question actually have feelings for the MC or not. I would be pretty devastated, if it turns out the RO never actually cared for the MC at any point, and was just using them.

The romance started out as a means to an end for the RO, but they developed feelings for the MC over time? Love it.

The RO was secretly the big bad, or some sort of betrayer all a long, but fell for the MC anyway? Yes, give me that delicious evil drama.

Plot forces the RO and MC apart, but they still care for each other? I can go for that tragic love.

The RO dies / is murdered / sacrifices themselves? It depends on how it’s done, and when it happens, but sure, sometimes that fine.

But do not tell me my MC was unwanted and unloved all along, that the intimacy and vulnerability and bonding really meant nothing.

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These kinds of ROs are probably the best. Especially the second one, where the RO sacrifices themselves in order for you to vanquish the big bad.

I didn’t mean “romance” as an “romance games” - I meant it as part of game in any genre.
(actually some of my favorite IFs are definitely not romance games!)
It doesn’t have to be main focus.

I don’t want to interact with false RO that is never going to care about my MC in affectionate/romantic way.

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Obsessive/possessive characters. Red flag love interests, basically yanderes. I am not romantizing them, but I would love to see more stories about them. Everyone writes stories about buliding a kindgom, going to the academy, defeating a demon lord, being a superhero… that’s why I would love to see stories more focused on relationships and it’s hardships.

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Don’t know if it’s very common (or if even counts as a troupe), but I would love to see more “undeniable loyalty” character archetype. Someone who’s devoted by you (not romantically, at least in start) and by your actions (either good/evil/mid).

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Oh hell yes. This, combined with the “Will burn the world down for you, if you would but ask it of me” is my absolute bias. (For examples, Hua Cheng from Tian Guan Ci Fu, Harley Quinn from Harley Quinn, And in a platonic example, Sirius Black from Harry Potter.)

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