Why don’t authors include a cheat menu?

To encourage people to pick their own, rather than having the wholesome suggestions already there.

2 Likes

I think this is why I don’t use cheats myself when playing CSGs, though I’m aware that I’ve implemented it in my own stuff for those who enjoy it. I liked following the lead of Cakes and Ale and also allowing reductions of stats so people can choose to see what happens if you fail a lot too.

For me I also feel like - people who want to cheat will do so anyway, but if I build in the ability to do it, they won’t cause bugs (even if their continuity might read oddly at points).

As mentioned a little way upthread, I’m planning to do a varied difficulty level for my next post Royal Affairs game, which wouldn’t touch stats but would change the success and failure thresholds of testing choices. I think that preserves the “identity” of the character even if it bends the story in or out of the player’s favour.

6 Likes

actually a nice exception to the rule.
Where in most games I got teached to get a feeling of which choice is what stat about and then go for it to win aka see a (good) ending, in FH I got for the first time really a choice of what I want to be.

Also going to add a voice of agreement here. Some stories do very well with cheat menus. Adrao’s games are a good example where you can choose how hard you want the game to be. I’ve got another “gamey” game in progress where you can choose difficulty levels. The more gamey a game is, or games that involve a lot of stat micromanaging to get the “correct” path or just games that have a focus on maxing out stats (like the heroes rise type games which have DLCs to do that), the better cheat menus often tend to work as you can choose between having a cruisy story experience through to needing to work against the odds.

On the other hand, with more story based games, a cheat menu isn’t always going to work well and may skew the storyline one way or another making it more difficult to see everything the game has to offer. “Bad” things or having to work at getting an event to happen can all be legit and satifying storyline experiences if written into the game that way, but would be missed if a cheat menu over rides that. Sometimes you can even access a more satisfying storyline from having lower stats if the game is not coded as one correct path.

There’s also the aspect that cheats can potentially break games, so implimenting them can be tricky to manage. I know I’ve had a game pirated where they modded it to give the player all the items and a heap of money from the start, and it actually locked players out of many scenes in the game because it registered that they didn’t need to aquire anything.

One cheat that I do think can work well with many games, is the option to take out early deaths if a game has them. Either by removing the ability to die early (eg Hero or villain) or having an in story reset point in the event of an early demise (like Oedipus).

3 Likes

I don’t care about having all items at once. I just want to pass checks. In games like these, you don’t have to give readers such hilarious cheats, just allow them success in all challenges, period. Usually, these games already have branches, so you can just look at this as another added branch. After all, aren’t people playing the branch they like most?

1 Like

Because that will ruins the fun