What is "Your Justification" for being a Vegetarian/Non-vegetarian?


#101

I eat meat, and like many of the others here I don’t need to justify what I eat, however I understand the op’s intentions and so I will tell some of the reasons why I eat meat.

  1. It’s cheap. I’ll be frank, I’m not trying to spend a bunch of cash on organic stuff that doesn’t even taste good that’ll probably eat through my pockets anyways.
  2. I’ve been raised on the stuff, of course I’ve had my fair share of mix between vegetables and meat, I could never feel full unless some part of my meal had meat in it. I couldn’t possibly transition to only herbs, beans, nuts and veggies ect. now.
  3. I don’t see any reason not to, other than yeah processed and hormonized meat. But they use hormones on fruits and vegetables as well. Even if that wasn’t the case, there are just more pros to eating both meat and greens than just being vegan.

If humans never existed to begin with, then the world wouldn’t need humans. But because of hundreds and thousands of years that humans have been alive, the world has adapted so well to them that if they all disappeared now it would probably doom life on earth as we know it.
Edit: But then again, if the world was given the same amount of time, then your absolutey correct that over that course nature would eventually adapt back to humans not existing.


#102

Meat being cheap… I was that was true where I live :joy:. In my area the only cheap meat is stuff like frozen chicken nuggets, if you want fresh meat prepare the wallet.

About humans disappearing, yes, if we did disappear it would be a catastrophe because of the nuclear plants. But as we have seen in places like Chernobyl, life would recover eventually. It would take far more time because the scale would be much bigger, and many species would possibly go extinct, but eventually nature would recover the planet :smiley:


#103

I first became vegetarian because I learned how rainforests were being destroyed for grazing. Then I stayed vegetarian because I didn’t have a good reason to stop and because it inspired me to cook more.

I started eating meat again when I lived overseas because I wanted to try everything and fully engage with the culture. Plus, being vegetarian in Japan is not easy. I kept eating meat through grad school and my first few years in Chicago because (a) too busy to deal and (b) being vegetarian held no challenge.

I became vegan because I was looking up vegan recipes to find something to bring to a social event where I’d promised a vegan dish. And I went from “this is a ludicrous diet” to “…I could do this.” So I decided to try and, again, I didn’t have a good reason to stop. Again, it inspired me to cook more and I learned a lot. It wasn’t as expensive as I expected (veggies are cheap, rice is cheap, tofu isn’t too bad, etc. As long as you avoid fake meat, organic stuff, and special vegan stuff, you’re good), either. Plus, oreos are vegan. :slight_smile:

I moved from vegan back to vegetarian because I realized I was remaining vegan out of spite (to prove I could) rather than belief. It is less of a Deal to go out to eat with friends and family. Family always made sure I had things to eat at holidays, but it is also easier for them to handle vegetarian than vegan. Being vegetarian also opens up baking options a bit more (though, there are some great and unexpected egg substitutes–aquafaba anyone?). That said, going vegan did help me realize the reason I used to get sick all the time is lactose intolerance.


#104

Chicken cuts are pretty cheap, get a pack of boneless for less than two bucks a pound. You are right that cheap isn’t a word to use with beef, though. Even the fattiest variety is $3 or much more a pound, and with a lot of that coming off during cooking. Poultry is the most cost-effective way to have fresh meat. Cow is expensive no matter how you slice it (pun intended).


#105

Food tastes the best if it had a soul.


#106

That’s a very Professor Chaos statement.


#107

simple nature made us omnivores and so i eat meat and veggies because who am i to argue with nature?


#108

I have gone through all the posts in this thread.
I would summarize the key points that make people choose their diet.

  1. Faith system
    “We worship this and that vs We worship, but only our plate.”
    (Pun intended)

  2. Health concern
    @BoisterousBumblebee @L_M
    “I am allergic to egg, meat and dairy products vs Meat !! Wow, it’s full of protein. Some are allergic to vegetables also (eg. carrots, Strawberries)”

  3. Taste concern
    @Pizza_is_good
    “Yeah! Yummy yummy,
    In my tummy.”

  4. Environmental concern
    @YahImTalkingToYou @Meira_Litch
    “Global warming, nature can take care of itself vs Stability in ecosystem, we humans should interfere to make this ecosystem stable.”

  5. Economy
    @books4breakfast
    “Vegetables are cheaper vs Meat is cheaper than dirt.”

  6. @Samuel H Young @AlexFalkor @Shiro_XKuro
    @Camille622
    “Love for animals vs We ourselves are animals, predators.”

  7. Moral obligation
    “We have mind to think and reason and act reasonably vs We are all powerful, we have every right to eat animals, they are food, we need food for our survival.”

  8. Some were convinced/forced to go for a certain diet, early from their childhood.
    Someone was coerced to eat meat at the age of 4 only. I feel really sorry for E_Redmark.

There are some people who say,“We don’t care at all.”

Someone says, “We do/would eat when animals are slaughtered in a less severe manner.”

“We would stop eating meat only when we get the replacement of animal flesh with some synthetic flesh, if at all possible with tech support.”

And the most fascinating one(though sounds ridiculous to me)…
“We eat Meat, because both plants (vegetables) and animals(meat) are living beings.
Why should we discriminate among them while choosing our food.
Let’s eat everything.”

Okay okay.
Now it’s my turn to put out my thought.

Well I am a non Vegetarian.

We need food. We need to eat.
Just don’t make it a Greed.

Everyone has the liberty to choose his/her own food.

But just don’t eat what you like.
Eat what your body and mind likes, eat what’s good for you.

Don’t presume that this or that is good/bad for my health. Do proper research. Know the consequences of eating foods(veg/non veg).
If you are ready to accept the consequences, then place that thing on your plate.

Isn’t this what our doctors advise us ?


#109

Sadly were I live meat is very expensive. Is much cheaper to have a vegetarian diet here, really. When I buy meat is more of a treat, really. A pack of 250g of chicken is around 2,50£ cries


#110

Well… if we really want to talk about environmental hazard, the daily electronic waste from discarded electronic items actually contribute more terrible hazard to the ecosystem of animals , not mentioning plastic or straw that we throw away everyday …
But to reduce electronic waste will means we shouldn’t upgrade or updated our electronic devices like PC, smartphones, game console , tv etc and i think apple will be the first who cry out loud if everyone refuse to change their phone…
And we should also ban motor sport especially F1 who is wasting lots of petroleum and producing lots of toxic gas…

And ummm… to the extreme of banning air conditional since it is releasing CFC that damage the ozon?? Which indirectly killing small animals as well :slight_smile:


#111

@Eric_knight
Who said people are “Honest” when they say they care for other animals or ecosystem.

Some people say,“We eat meat, but still we love animals.”
“Who the hell are you to question our love for them.”

Oh!! This is nonsense.
People just can’t love an animal and at the same time eat its flesh.
We love our pets. That’s the only reason we human beings don’t eat the flesh of our pets.


#112

Nice try, but no. I’ve been been to plenty of places in Asia since I live and work here.
And you can be damn sure people consume meat A LOT here, mainly because meat here is much cheaper( seriously, it’s so cheap I could eat comfortably for like a week off what the average American spends daily on food).

I would like to introduce you to a place called Asia where dog and cat meat is a commodity. It’s a cultural staple at this point for some nations.

And even if we were to only take into consideration Western culture, some people have fish as pet, but we still eat fish, do we not?


#113

Some people, here and there, all over the world have diversified food habits.

Some do eat monkeys, snakes, lizards, cockroaches, snails, insects and what not…

Asia,
Well, I am from Asia.

Some Asian people like Chinese, have very unusual food habits. I am well aware of that.

But the place where I am from, they abhor eating pets.
This is the difference between animals and we human beings.
When we loose that consciousness, we are no better than any cannibal.


#114

Well my answer is probably weird and silly but it’s in our relegion to not eat meat so as everyone in my family follows this relegion so from childhood I have never tasted it and well now I don’t see the need to. I might try it in the furture though not.for now.


#115

cannibalism implies eating your own species. So unless you’re saying eating certain kinds of meat is just as bad as eating human flesh, you need to reevaluate your logic

The whole point I was saying is that the places you are NOT from have different perspectives on what is good to eat. You might abhor it or whatever but they don’t care what you think.
Does that make them inhumane? Obviously not.


#116

Interesting! My friends from Asia and all the stats I’ve seen seem to say meat consumption in the US way outstrips that in Asia! Mind if I ask what countries? I’m not doubting you, just was going based off my knowledge of what I’ve seen/read, which seems to be that unless you’re quite wealthy there’s nothing like the meat at every meal situation many Americans have. Or at least not meat as a feature of every meal, or the belief that it isn’t really “a meal” if there’s no meat.

I do think it’s pretty hypocritical for people to lose their mind over eating a dog/cat (I mean unless it’s THEIR dog or cat) if they also eat cows. I mean, I think it’s super fine to be like “ok, I was culturally raised that cows are to be eaten and dogs aren’t” but another to unilaterally state “It’s wrong to eat dog but fine to eat cow.”


#117

I’m half Japanese (even tho people assume I’m from any country in east Asia -_-), and I can tell you right now, in a bunch of eastern Asia countries, they don’t eat dog meat as much as some people think, especially because dogs and cats are also kept as pets in these places (especially cats), but I mean…Don’t go leaving your dog unleashed near a butchery :rofl:.

Yeah, I mean I know in many Indian states, the slaughter of cows is already illegal because in the practice of Hinduism cows are sacred. But it’s not like a Hindu is going to walk up to you and say "STOP EATING BEEF, THEY’RE SO IMPORTANT TO US, or "I can’t believe you eat beef, ewww gross, “that’s messed up”. Most people who follow Hinduism don’t eat beef, that’s all, they don’t go to Americans and other countries where beef is a prime dish and start criticizing them. So why would people from other countries berate some people from China that have eaten cats and dogs? So long as it’s not your own I don’t see why you should care…Need I remind you, humans domesticated dogs. They were originally wild animals. Sorry if I came off too strong but this is a common stereotype that needed to be addressed.


#118

Well, I’m Italian and here we eat meat literally with everything, even with pasta, the most common example is Lasagna, the traditional and original one (made in almost every house in Italy) has cheese and minced meat as basic ingredients. For me it is nearly impossible to think of a day where I DON’T eat meat, mostly because we have a tradition here where one meal is divided in “first course”, “second course” and fruits and/or dessert (in restaurants usually there are more than 2 courses). And the first course is 98% of times pasta (it can be with meat but also with vegetables or fish) but even if you don’t eat pasta with meat, the second course will almost certainly involve fish or meat with with vegetables as side dish.

Of course there are exceptions, mostly in north Italy, but here in the south if I tell my grandma that I don’t eat meat she would likely yell at me xD, as I said there are exceptions of course but in the centre and the south if you tell someone that you don’t eat meat (ESPECIALLY adults and old people) they will look at you in a very strange way. The young generation is trying to change things of course, because everyone must be free to eat whatever they want, but still, is a long way.

Also something that is very VERY popular here is the “agritourism” (I hate them!!) where you basically see all the animals happy in the farm and you even pet them but then when you go to the agritourism’s restaurant you eat them >.< (fortunately (?) is better than some slaughterhouse, because they try to kill them in the fastes and painless way possible)


#119

Even outside agriturisms, for the italian law (I’m Italian too) all slaughterhouses must kill animals as painless as possible. Those who don’t are outlaw, and should be reported to the autorities.

Most agriturisms serve mostly bio product from their activities, mostly cheese and derivate.

I know my grandparents would have sent me in my room with no food at all, if I told them I refused to eat meat (and I never will!) because for people who tasted the Hunger during WW2, when food was scarce, and even cats where eaten (masked as “rabbit meat”) it would have felt like a slap in the face.


#120

All true, my grandma lost her husband during war, so for her that would be a true affront.

Sadly I have not recovered yet from a bad experience happened in an agriturisms, there was this cow named Luisa, she was so cute and friendly and she became my friend for a day, when I returned there after few months, I asked the owner where she was, and with a laugh he answered me “you are eating her”. I was only 8 years old so… imagine.