Research Help on Versailles


#1

Hello, I need a bit of help. Currently i’m very bored and I was trying to do some research on the court of Versailles, you know the etiquette etc…(For a game i might make). I was looking for a book on the subject, but I did not find anything. There’re sites that do talk a bit about it, some of them add stuff and some of them change things. which sites can I trust for reliable information?

Also, if anyone knows of a book on that subject, can you write the name down.


#2

You might try https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=AeCMAQAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=court+of+Versailles&ots=J9Ao6PZc0T&sig=Jo4IHFj3tuXVoXE0lB_94pypqHk#v=onepage&q=court%20of%20Versailles&f=false


#3

Try looking things up on Google scholer.


#4

This is a good starting point: http://en.chateauversailles.fr/discover/history#the-reign-of-louis-xv1715-1774

Also, think about which time you’re going for - it’ll be easier to research ‘the court of Louis the whatever’ rather than just the court of Versailles, since it was used by more than one king.


#5

I do not know if it’s necessary good for court etiquette but there’s a fantastic book called The Splendid century give that looking!


#6

I hope this helps. :slight_smile:

https://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/rschwart/hist255-s01/pleasure/Etiquette.html


#7

Okay, this is an unconventional suggestion, but it’s one that’s helped me before when I didn’t know a lot about a time period. Watch Versailles (it’s on Netflix.) Don’t take anything for granted as accurate, but if you see something interesting in terms of customs, clothing, history, a person, etc., research that specifically.

Reading an overview of a time period, people tend to cover the same general information, and it can feel impersonal and vague. When doing the research to tell a story, TV writers need all kinds of specific details that you wouldn’t think to include in a general history. A historical drama can give you ideas about what to research - underwear, games, superstitions - that you can weave into a more personal, living understanding of the time period.

Without this method, I’d have no idea that people in the Renaissance got high on ether, or that in Michelangelo and Donatello’s time the peasants were still pretty homophobic; before binging the Borgias, I didn’t think to ask.


#8

This. They find all of the cool little facts that your average textbook or what have you won’t cover because of length and subject matter. Also you can drop a question or search for Versailles on ask historians. It’s a fun little subreddit where the questions are generally answered by well, historians.
Not to mention the moderation is incredibly high and well done. I.e when someone posts a misinformed or poorly researched answer it’s removed and the reason for the removal is posted. People tend to ask incredibly specific questions so you might find some neat stuff