If you were to give them an advice/wisdom, what would you say?


#1

I really want to know what your guys thoughts and wisdom. If you had to tell someone an advice or a wisdom to someone and its from your own experience in life, what would you say? If your young, old, in the middle or any, I would like to hear your shed of wisdom.

Or you give wisdom to me, I am suffering from internal conflict. I am dealing with social anxiety, anxiety in general and somewhat depression in my life, can you give me advice how to deal with it?

Edit: Confuse right now about anxiety, social anxiety and depression if I really have them. So don’t try to give me advice right now, hope you guys have a great day.


#2

Well I’ve seen fortune cookies which have said “This is a fortune cookie” and “Ignore previous fortune”, so let’s go with those


#3

My thoughts? No matter what happens, you’re going to eventually die at some point. So don’t waste this small fragment of time that you have thinking of what others might think of you. Look at the positive to everything! If someone’s troubling you, then you can be happy knowing that one day, they shall die too! Heck, there is a 50% chance that they’ll die before you!

But most importantly, I wouldn’t trust a single thing that @BlazedStorm says here. He’s just not right in the head, ya know?

Seriously though, I have been through similar times. You’ve just got to look at the issue and realise just how insignificant it is compared with the life you have ahead of you. Of course, I have limited information on the actual issue you have, so I’ll have to make do with general pointers.

woof.


#4

This article has really helped me out the past few years:

Number 3 especially. The fact of the matter is that no one, including yourself, can “love you for you”. I was miserable for a long period of time because I trapped myself in empty endeavors. I was an articulate critic and an outrage junky for a cause—Libertarian in my case—and no matter how much I poured into this I never felt good about myself.

My advice to you and anyone is to pursue creating things instead of just consuming them. You’ll become more stoic, more mellow, and most importantly: you’ll like yourself a whole lot more.


#5

I’m going to assume I’m addressing young people, and then my advice would be thus; Even if you’re tired of school, try to buckle down and take it seriously. You may not always learn something that you have use for, but the grades you get are hard currency in the big bad world, and if you don’t get them early, you’ll be wasting a lot of time later on.
And pick a career path early in life and work hard towards it, it doesn’t matter if you change your mind later, what matters is getting a foot inside the door somewhere, anywhere, so you can acquire some form of work experience. Don’t expect things to just fall into place by themselves, if you don’t know your path in life, you’re not magically going to wake up one day and just know it. Having a job while you’re considering your options however will alleviate a lot of pressure from you.

Don’t trust society, religion, history or the media, be critical and make up your own mind, don’t swallow them prechewed from others.

And one more thing, always strive to overcome yourself and your own doubts, better you make a fool of yourself for one hour, a day or a week, than to regret a lifetime of lost opportunities.

As for your problems, I can offer nothing but the obvious, therapy and possibly medication. Sometimes depression stems from synapses not firing right, that can’t be helped by anything other than medication.


#6

Definitely consider therapy and medication – I’ve been greatly helped by both. They don’t help everyone, but don’t let that possibility (or, more likely, the totally unjustified stigma that still surrounds both) keep you from trying.

I don’t have a whole lot of generic advice to offer, but the theme of what I have would definitely be Amazing Grace – “tis grace that brought me safe thus far, and grace will lead me home.”

In life, you will often be wrong – despite your best efforts you will believe mistaken ideas, pour your work into things that turn out to be destructive or counter-productive, hurt people through omission or deliberate acts. The quest to live ethically ends in failure – or at least passes through it and never leaves it behind.

The ability to not deny your failing but seek and accept forgiveness, to forgive yourself, and accept that your worth does not depend on your ability to avoid failure… in my experience, that grace is the key to living free.


#7

Stuff like depression and anxiety, a lot of the time, comes from wrong prospective… I used to feel like no one liked me in my younger teen years…but it was not true at all. I felt abandoned by my friends so thought I had no worth…but that wasn’t true either.

We believe so many lies and run our life by them and our emotions are controlled by them…it’s really sad…
we can even try focus on what is true such as “well I know I am loved…” and try to get self worth out of that…but…that isn’t the answer either…
so…
let’s stop focusing on our selves! because we might not be able to help ourselves but we can help others.

EVERYONE…and I do mean EVERYONE can mean something to someone… what I mean by that is it doesn’t matter if we feel loved or not…we might not have power over that…but we CAN choose to maker sure that we make OTHERS feel loved. so the less we focus on ourselves and more on others, the better we actually feel… someone always has it worse then us…let’s not waste time focusing on our small problems when we could be reaching out to others who really need us.

hope that made sense X]


#8

#9

“I think therefore I am” René Descartes

The original meaning was suppose to prove the existence itself, but I think it could mean ‘you think like that therefore it shall be like that’. You depress because you think life is depress, and while it might be so, think of something else.

Because thinking of something we do not, and will never, understand could drive a man mad. Try to live and enjoy life, socialize here and there. That the problem of most depressed people and philosopher, they all think and no action. I am different, well maybe I am not really different, but thinking so is good and healthy for me so I continue.

It the end, the answers and advices is depend on you, not on me. I can take horse to river, but I can’t force it to drink.


#10
  1. Don’t take yourself too seriously.
  2. Try to find a funny side to every situation.
  3. If you want to socialize go to some place with people. They generally won’t come falling through the roof.

#11

Humanity can amaze angels with its compasion, and it can make demons sneer in disgust at its crimes. You cant Predict the humanity at 100% so be prepared for any situation Young Demon,To Crush them You need to be unpredictable

Hope you dont mind i took Creative Liberties with this ? :smiley:


#12

I don’t really have any wisdom to offer. Never been very good at that type of thing. I’ve dealt with similar issues, though, and I would suggest what some here have already: see your doctor and a therapist and work out a plan to tackle your problems. This may include taking prescribed medication. I can’t speak for anyone else’s experience, but the proper medicine really helped me stave off some pretty horrible anxiety and just improved my mood in general. Don’t self-medicate, though. Again, see your doctor and a therapist. They’re professionals and they are there to help you.


#13

@Sneaks There are a lot of people who can’t afford that or in unreachable area you know.


#14

I’m just going to repeat what other people are saying, speak to your doctor. Medication. Therapy. Keep trying until something eventually works. Make sure the doctor rules out any physical causes.


#15

@555sarin

That’s unfortunate.

I am not a font of wisdom and never claimed to be, I can only relate what worked for me personally. If this person in particular cannot feasibly acquire proper healthcare, then I am very sorry for that.


#16

If you are just feeling down you could try Meditations (title of the book) by Marcus Aurelius.
Just short pieces of text which might be able to offer some comfort / advice.

Think of things like:

“I have often wondered how it is that every man loves himself more than all the rest of men, but yet sets less value on his own opinion of himself than on the opinion of others.”

“Don’t be ashamed to need help. Like a soldier storming a wall, you have a mission to accomplish. And if you’ve been wounded and you need a comrade to pull you up? So what?”

Hope it helps.


#17

I’ll admit that I’ve never had a depression in my life and I’m still pretty young so I dont have the wisdom most people here have but I’ll try to help anyways.
Well one thing I’ve done all my life was think positive about everything, Sure optimism isnt always realistic but hey its better then thinking about depression all day isnt it? (I guess that kinda depends on how you look at it but i always prefer optimism over realism).
Also don’t waste time thinking about all the mistakes you’ve made, because if you do that then you’ll forget all the great things you’ve done.
And comedy’s a helpful source in many situations, so it wouldn’t surprise me if its good in depressions too, so maybe try that.

Hope that helps.


#18

I found anxiety and depression easier to deal with when I was able to stop thinking of them as things that defined me or my identity. Anxiety is a thing that happens to me; it’s not who I am.

Sometimes I think of it as a snowstorm: when it happens, I have to do some extra things for myself, the same way I have to bundle up and brush the snow off of my car and drive a little more carefully when it snows. The snowstorm isn’t me; it’s a thing that happens to me. (Admittedly it’s an annoying, difficult, and potentially dangerous thing, but I do my best with it.)

The fire alarm metaphor also works well for me. Anxiety can be like having an overactive fire alarm that goes off every time you use the toaster. You know, rationally, that there’s no fire, but that stupid alarm keeps making noise and you can’t get it to stop. I am learning to recognize the alarm for what it is – which, again, is not ME; it’s just a faulty alarm. (a really annoying one.)

Thinking this way can help me focus on who I really am, and what I love, and what I do. But I would echo what everyone else is saying: if you are struggling with these things, take advantage of whatever help is available to you. Getting help doesn’t mean you’re weak; it means you’re taking responsibility for your life and your happiness.


#19

(I’m going to use “you” in a general sense.)

If I had the opportunity to tell the whole world something, I’d tell them that things happen and you can’t blame yourself for it if it’s out of your control. Sometimes things happen to us and we blame ourselves when we have to know that blame, if it is to be placed on anyone, should be shared. If things happened and it is your fault, even in the slightest, acknowledge that, but don’t let yourself dwell on it. It happened. You can’t change it. Keep moving. The sun will rise again.

From my person experience with anxiety, I tend to have to “dive into” situations that make me anxious. If there’s a party I’m anxious to go to because I have some irrational fear that my friends will ignore me, I have to just go and “dive in”. I have to just jump head first and things tend to work out. I see that my anxiety was misplaced.

From my own personal experience with depression, you have to make sure you realize that you are not the problem. Your depression is not you. You also have to realize that your depression is going to seem like a mountain some days. You’re going to feel like Sisyphus rolling a boulder uphill, only to have your progress be for naught. But other days you’re going to feel like you can fold your depression up and put it in your pocket. It’s just something you have to take day by day, I guess.

Sorry if this was long. I was sort of rambling.


#20

I’m not quite the guardian of wisdom, I have learned a few things.
*Never blindly follow anything or anyone. Everybody is under different circumstances, and everybody has different biases and ideas. Blindly following so called “friends” once led me into a life of no compassion, and much narcissism. I was so pretentious I was left alone for many years by many people. I lost many friends that I could never get back.
*Don’t be afraid of ideas. Though I am now conservative in many of my ideas, I still had to find and understand everybody’s ideas before I could choose my beliefs.