Game Mechanics

What are some things you appreciate from a game? I really appreciate when games re-state your choice on the following page. I’m writing a game and have a list of these kinds of things but I would like to hear from other players.

5 Likes

Option to be nonbinary (not “neither male nor female” or “both male and female” – neither of those are what nonbinary means) and still use he/him pronouns.

Aromantic option that doesn’t lock out relationships (I’m cupioromantic).

3 Likes

I like games that allow me to customize my character. Name and gender are obviously a must, but appearance is nice too, hair color, eye color, maybe an outfit. It really lets me dig into the roleplay.

3 Likes

Relationship stats for factions, countries, etc. Y’know, relationships beyond romanceables. Also those free periods in a game, such as when your character gets the day off, allowing you to develop skills and relationships as you see fit. Also, this isn’t something I’ve seen in any game, but it’s something I’m doing in my current project: Next to each option in a stat test, I put the difficulty level in parenthesis. (Easy) (Medium) (Hard) Here’s an example of what it would be like: in a fight, you have four choices:
1.Fight fast and dirty, go for his vitals. (Hard)
2.Try to talk out your differences before this gets out of hand. (Medium)
3.Try to use your superior size and strength to overpower him. (Medium)
4.Just focus on defending. (Easy)
In the first option, the stat being tested is Cunning. It’s a hard test that requires high skill to pull off, but the result will have the highest payout, and may or may not result in an achievement as a reward. The second and third options require Diplomacy and Might, respectively, and are medium difficulty. You’ll have to actually have devoted some time into developing the required stats, but it’s not one of those ‘build nothing else but this stat’ sort of things. And they let you succeed pretty well, too. The last option is the easiest, and relies on the default amount of Endurance you start the game with. In other words, it’s the ‘ditch’ choice for when you haven’t developed any of the available stat choices. It’s guaranteed success, but usually only slightly better than outright failing at one of the other stat checks. This is my solution to wanting different levels of stat mastery for each choice, while not leaving the player out in the lurch trying to figure out how much they need for a particular test. Each difficulty level has a set amount (Hard is 75, Medium is 50, Easy is 25) so that eliminates the possible confusion.

3 Likes

I like character customisation and the ability to choose my own name and surname or gender. Authors not willing to budge on that will receive a -1 rating for each name I can’t enter, plus a -1 rating for each gender I can’t choose. I’m just hardcore like that. Experimental features like cheat codes or menus are a bonus and I tend to add +1 ratings for those if available. Oh and let’s not forget orientation.

Mostly? Player Character customization (gender, name, appearance, etc). That’s one of the reasons why I’m attracted to CoG/HG after all.

A reasonable stats check, or a penalty that doesn’t punish you so heavily, when you fail on stats check.

2 Likes

Tell me what stat values mean! If I have a 50% lockpick, what does that mean in the world? What type of locks can I reliably pick?

And give me some indication of how hard a test is going to be (not necessarily the way @Ivan_the_Sword_Angel does it; I’m happy with a text descriptor). “The chest appears to make use a Webber lock, rumoured to be impossible to pick”, for example, tells me that I need to have lockpicking up the wazoo if I want to succeed (or have met a dude called Abuk).

5 Likes

I like when stories have a character list where it shows their appearance and relationship to the main character - not just a name and a stats bar. I read so many IF projects and I have the tendency to forget or mix up characters.

2 Likes

Games that let me choose my background or profession and the story adapts to that.

3 Likes

Yes, this! I know it’s a delicate balancing act, creating a character that’s open-ended enough for us to project our imaginations into while still being specific enough that it feels like an actual character in a story and not a game of Mad Libs. But I appreciate it when authors make the effort to do it well.

2 Likes