Free games are free right?

(I’m responding to an old post, because people still make the same mistake.)

When you see anything advertised as free, you have to check to see if there is any fine print.

It’s like when you see “Zero Percent APR” on a credit card, there is almost always fine print, like this is an introductory rate only valid for the first 6 months, blah blah blah.

In the case of Choice of Games… let’s go to the main page, right?
Ok so one of the games I see advertised on the main page is Eagle’s Heir.
Let’s click Play Online.
I am now on this URL.

So if you scroll down, you see how they have two big grey buttons?
One says: Buy It Now for $4.99
The other says: Play Now For Free

Now, do you see directly above the Buy It Now button where it says:
You can play the first three chapters of the game for free. Purchase the rest of the game below.

That right there is not even fine print at all.
It’s normal print.
But people skip over it sometimes, and get confused.
But that’s the player’s fault for not reading, yeah?
It says clearly right there that you will only get to “play the first three chapters.”

@Carlos.R
The problem with fine print is that its usually done in a way that its easily skippable or missed by the reader/costumer. Kinda like those ads on TV that sound amazing but then come with extremely fine print that you can hardly see and/or skip to fast for you to read. People read the word “free” and presume it means “free game” not “free demo”. Rather than saying “Play now for free” it should say “Try the demo now” - it makes a world of a diference.

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@IvoryOwl

I agree, and have suggested as much at least once before.
You can ask @RETowers :wink:
However, the powers that be seem to want to keep things the way they are, at least for now.

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